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Looking at Totem Poles
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 192

Looking at Totem Poles

Magnificent and haunting, the tall cedar sculptures called totem poles have become a distinctive symbol of the native people of the Northwest Coast. The powerful carvings of the vital and extraordinary beings such as Sea Bear, Thunderbird and Cedar Man are impressive and intriguing. In Looking at Totem Poles, Hilary Stewart describes the various types of poles, their purpose, and how they were carved and raised. She also identifies and explains frequently depicted figures and objects. Each pole, shown in a beautifully detailed drawing, is accompanied by a text that points out the crests, figures and objects carved on it. Historical and cultural background are given, legends are recounted and often the carver’s comments or anecdotes enrich the pole’s story. Photographs put some of the poles into context or show their carving and raising.

Operation Husky
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 480

Operation Husky

On July 10, 1943, two great Allied armadas of over 2,000 ships readied to invade Sicily. This was Operation Husky, the first step toward winning a toehold in fascist-occupied Europe. Among the invaders were 20,000 Canadian troops serving in the First Canadian Infantry Division and First Canadian Tank Brigade — in their first combat experience. Over the next 28 days, the Allied troops carved a path through the rugged land, despite fierce German opposition. Drawing on firsthand accounts of veterans and official military records, Operation Husky offers a gripping, meticulous account of this seminal operation and the young men who fought, died, and survived it.

No Time
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 272

No Time

These days, we all have too much to do and too little time. This book is about how technology has changed our lives and what we can do about it. What happened to the promise that technology would give us more leisure time? Instead, we are working harder and for longer hours than we did fifteen years ago, squeezed and scattered and stressed to the point of burnout. We are trying to cope with a constantly accelerating pace brought about by cutbacks and restructuring, but also by computers and cell phones that, in their super-efficient dispatch of data, text and voice messages and the like, let us do more things faster than ever before. Yet somewhere between the multi-tasking pace and the sea of data divorced from real life, we're losing touch with ourselves and with each other. We're even losing a sense of how to tell when things go wrong and how to take action when they do. We need to take back our lives, and renew the humanity of our social institutions.

Oka
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 208

Oka

On July 11, 1990, tension between white and Mohawk people at Oka, just west of Montreal, took a violent turn. At issue was the town's plan to turn a piece of disputed land in the community of Kanesatake into a golf course. Media footage of rock-throwing white residents and armed, masked Mohawk Warriors facing police across barricades shocked the world and galvanized Aboriginal people across the continent. In August, Quebec Premier Robert Bourassa called for the Canadian army to step in. Harry Swain was deputy minister of Indian Affairs throughout the 78 -day standoff, and his recreation of events is dramatic and opinionated. Swain writes frankly about his own role and offers fascinating prof...

On to Victory
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 416

On to Victory

The eighth Canadian Battle Series volume is the little-told story of the tense final days of World War II, remembered in the Netherlands as “the sweetest of springs,” which saw the country’s liberation from German occupation. The Liberation Campaign, a series of fierce, desperate battles during the last three months of the war, was bittersweet. A nation’s freedom was won and the war concluded, but these final hostilities cost Canada 6,298 casualties, including 1,482 dead. With his trademark “you are there” style that draws upon official records, veteran memories, and a keen understanding of the combat experience, Mark Zuehlke brings to life this concluding chapter in the story of Canada in World War II. May 4, 2010, will mark the 65th anniversary of the Netherlands’ liberation.

Looking at Indian Art of the Northwest Coast
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 111

Looking at Indian Art of the Northwest Coast

  • Categories: Art

Bold, inventive indigenous art of the Northwest Coast is distinguished by its sophistication and complexity. It is also composed of basically simple elements which, guided by a rich mythology, create images of striking power. In Looking at Indian Art of the Northwest Coast, Hilary Stewart introduces the elements of style; interprets the myths and legends which shape the motifs; and defines and illustrates the stylistic differences between the major cultural groupings. Raven, Thunderbird, Killer Whale, Bear: all the traditional forms are here, deftly analyzed by a professional writer and artist who has a deep understanding of this powerful culture.

Radio Belly
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 240

Radio Belly

In the surreal world of Buffy Cram's stories, someone or something slips beneath the skin of her already beleaguered characters. Stealing into their worlds, it rearranges the familiar into something strange and possibly threatening, making off with their emotional and even physical goods. A smug suburbanite becomes obsessed with the 'hybrids,' the wandering mob of intellectual vagrants overrunning his complacent little cul de sac, snacking on pate and reciting poetry; a father and daughter's post-apocalyptic Pacific island civilization, built of floating garbage and sustained entirely by rubber, is beginning to fray, literally, revealing something disastrously like moss beneath its smooth synthetic skin; following an appendectomy, a young woman's belly starts transmitting what sound like Russian radio signals. Inhabited, occupied, possessed--suddenly, the world as they knew it is no longer quite recognizable, not to mention safe-if it actually was safe before. But it's the surprising, often revelatory ways in which Cram's characters navigate through these strange new landscapes that imbues these stories with complexity, grace and luster.

Challenges
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 208

Challenges

Wang Chin-yun, a Buddhist nun born in Taiwan in 1937 and now known as the Venerable Master Cheng Yen, is one of the world's most inspiring yet largely unrecognized women. At the age of 29, she established the Tzu Chi Foundation, an organization committed to compassion and relief that today numbers 5 million volunteer members in more than 45 countries worldwide, including the United States. In the United States, Tzu Chi members provided assistance during many catastrophic events including the 1992 Los Angeles riots, the 9/11 attacks in New York, and Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Challenges details Master Yen's extraordinary vision, her tenacity in the face of numerous hurdles, and the lessons she and her followers have learned over the years.

Arthur Erickson
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 512

Arthur Erickson

Arthur Erickson, Canada's pre-eminent philosopher architect, was renowned internationally for his innovative approach to landscape, his genius for spatial composition, and his epic vision of architecture for people. Among his most celebrated large-scale works are three that helped to define Vancouver's urban landscape: Simon Fraser University, on Burnaby Mountain; the Robson Square complex at the heart of the city; and the exquisite Museum of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia. Travel was key to Erickson's creative process; floating high above the clouds on extended airline flights, he made preliminary drawings on vellum with his fine-point black felt-tip pen, designing influ...

Sea of Slaughter
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 419

Sea of Slaughter

The northeastern seaboard of North America, extending from Labrador to Cape Cod, was the first region of North America to suffer from human exploitation. Farley Mowat informs the extensive historical and biological research with his direct experience living in and observing this region. When it was first published nearly thirty years ago, Sea of Slaughter served as a catalyst for environment reform, raising awareness of the decline and destruction of marine and coastal species. Today, it remains a prescient and chilling environmental classic, serving, now as ever, as a haunting reminder of the impact of human interest on the natural world.