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An Anatomy of Humor
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 192

An Anatomy of Humor

People experience humor daily through television, newspapers, literature, and contact with others. Rarely do social researchers analyze humor or try to determine what makes it such a dominating force in our lives.

Engaging Humor
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 208

Engaging Humor

"Analyzed contextually and comparatively, humorous expressions emerge as forms of human communication whose implications are startling, engaging, and profound. Engaging Humor explores Freud's theory that every thought contains a joke. Elliott Oring suggests that racist humor is not rooted in repression and offers a new perspective on other forms of humor seemingly based on hatred. He also addresses the use of jokes as commentaries on the conversations in which they are embedded and considers the similiarites in the humorous traditions of the United States, Australia, and Israel - each formed through colonization in modern times."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

The Senses of Humor
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 267

The Senses of Humor

Why do modern Americans believe in something called a sense of humor, and how did they come to that belief? Daniel Wickberg traces the relatively short cultural history of the concept to its British origins as a way to explore new conceptions of the self and social order in modern America. More than simply the history of an idea, Wickberg's study provides new insights into a peculiarly modern cultural sensibility. The expression "sense of humor" was first coined in the 1840s, and the idea that such a sense was a personality trait to be valued developed only in the 1870s. What is the relationship between medieval humoral medicine and this distinctively modern idea of the sense of humor? What ...

The Psychology of Humor
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 464

The Psychology of Humor

Research on humor is carried out in a number of areas in psychology, including the cognitive (What makes something funny?), developmental (when do we develop a sense of humor?), and social (how is humor used in social interactions?) Although there is enough interest in the area to have spawned several societies, the literature is dispersed in a number of primary journals, with little in the way of integration of the material into a book. Dr. Martin is one of the best known researchers in the area, and his research goes across subdisciplines in psychology to be of wide appeal. This is a singly authored monograph that provides in one source, a summary of information researchers might wish to k...

Good Humor, Bad Taste
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 293

Good Humor, Bad Taste

Using a combination of interview materials, survey data, and historical materials, this book explores the relationship between humor and gender, age, regional background, and especially, humor and social class in the Netherlands. It also describes the history of the genre and its decline in status from the sixteenth century onwards.

Linguistic Theories of Humor
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 426

Linguistic Theories of Humor

So this English professor comes into class and starts talking about the textual organization of jokes, the taxonomy of puns, the relations between the linguistic form and the content of humorous texts, and other past and current topics in language-based research into humor. At the end he stuffs all

The Game of Humor
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 197

The Game of Humor

Humor, wit, and laughter surround each person. From everyday quips to the carefully contrived comedy of literature, newspapers, and television we experience humor in many forms, yet the impetus for our laughter is far from innocuous. Misfortune, stupidity, and moral or cultural defects, however faintly revealed in others and ourselves, seem to make us laugh. Although discomforting, such negative terms as superiority, aggression, hostility, ridicule, or degradation can be applied to instances of humor. According to scholars, Thomas Hobbes's "superiority theory"--that humor arises from mischances, infirmities, and indecencies, where there is no wit at all--applies to most humor. With the excep...

Humor 101
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 264

Humor 101

"Humor is complex, and the author, Mitch Earleywine, does an exceptional job of covering the big bases of humor from a research perspective in a small space with a readable content. When I first picked up this book and began reading it, I was looking for depth. What I found was an overview and at the same time a very exciting way to provide an entrÈe into psychology-a vehicle for students to grab hold of topics central to psychology but studiedand researched in terms of modern themes, and particularly humor." --PsycCRITIQUES "I've just finished reading Humor 101 with great interest and admiration. The book combines psychological research and practicality beautifully and humorously." -- Bob ...

Humor in the Advertising Business
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 205

Humor in the Advertising Business

Beard's Humor in the Advertising Business offers a concise yet thorough exploration of how advertising humor works. As one of advertising's most frequently used tactics, humor is an admittedly complicated topic. Supported with dozens of the world's funniest ads, insights from creative strategists and artists, and decades of research, Humor in the Advertising Business surveys the whimsical side of modern advertising. Great as a supplemental text in Advertising Principles, Copywriting, and Advertising Strategy courses.

Comic Relief
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 208

Comic Relief

Comic Relief: A Comprehensive Philosophy of Humor develops an inclusive theory that integrates psychological, aesthetic, and ethical issues relating to humor Offers an enlightening and accessible foray into the serious business of humor Reveals how standard theories of humor fail to explain its true nature and actually support traditional prejudices against humor as being antisocial, irrational, and foolish Argues that humor’s benefits overlap significantly with those of philosophy Includes a foreword by Robert Mankoff, Cartoon Editor of The New Yorker