Seems you have not registered as a member of easywebbookmarks.info!

You may have to register before you can download all our books and magazines, click the sign up button below to create a free account.

Sign up

Making Truth
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 215

Making Truth

InMaking Truth: Metaphor in ScienceTheodore L. Brown argues that most laypeople, and many scientists, do not have a clear understanding of how metaphor relates to scientific thinking. With stunning clarity, and bridging the worlds of scientists and nonscientists, Brown demonstrates the presence and the power of metaphorical thought. To illustrate the roles of metaphor in science, Brown presents a series of studies of scientific systems. These range from the atom, historically one of the most important ideas in science, through models in chemistry and biology, including current "hot" topics such as protein folding, chaperone proteins, and global warming. The case studies inMaking Truthillustrate the deeply metaphorical nature of scientific reasoning and communication. They provide the basis for far-reaching conclusions about science as an intellectual and social practice and about the nature of scientific truth.

The Science Book
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 352

The Science Book

  • Author(s): DK
  • Type: Book
  • -
  • Published: 2015-02-02
  • -
  • Publisher: Penguin

The Science Book explores how scientists have sought to explain our world and the universe, and how scientific discoveries have been made. A new title in DK's successful "Big Ideas, Simply Explained" series, this book on science and the history of science looks at topics such as why Copernicus's ideas were contentious, how Galileo worked out his theories on motion and inertia, and what the discovery of DNA meant. The Science Book covers every area of science--astronomy, biology, chemistry, geology, math, and physics, and brings the greatest scientific ideas to life with fascinating text, quirky graphics, and pithy quotes.

Science as Social Knowledge
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 262

Science as Social Knowledge

"Helen Longino has written a timely book that fills a critical gap in the existing literature between philosophy of science and the social studies of science. Her exposition of scientific inquiry as a context-laden process provides the conceptual tools we need to understand how social expectations shape the development of science while at the same time recognizing the dependence of scientific inquiry on its interactions with natural phenomena. This is an important book precisely because there is none other quite like it." --Evelyn Fox Keller, author of "Reflections on Gender and Science" Conventional wisdom has it that the sciences, properly pursued, constitute a pure, value-free method of o...

The Architecture of Science
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 573

The Architecture of Science

  • Type: Book
  • -
  • Published: 1999
  • -
  • Publisher: MIT Press

How do the spaces in which science is done shape the identity of the scientist andthe self-conception of scientific fields? How do the sciences structure the identity of thearchitect and the practice of architecture in a specific period? And how does the design of spacessuch as laboratories, hospitals, and museums affect how the public perceives and interacts with theworld of science? The Architecture of Science offers a dazzling set of speculations on these issuesby historians of science, architecture, and art; architectural theorists; and sociologists as wellas practicing scientists and architects. The essays are organized into six sections: "Of Secrecy andOpenness: Science and Architecture in Early Modern Europe"; "Displaying and Concealing Technics inthe Nineteenth Century"; "Modern Space"; "Is Architecture Science?"; "Princeton after Modernism: TheLewis Thomas Laboratory for Molecular Biology"; and "Centers, Cities, and Colliders."

Science on American Television
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 304

Science on American Television

As television emerged as a major cultural and economic force, many imagined that the medium would enhance civic education for topics like science. And, indeed, television soon offered a breathtaking banquet of scientific images and ideas—both factual and fictional. Mr. Wizard performed experiments with milk bottles. Viewers watched live coverage of solar eclipses and atomic bomb blasts. Television cameras followed astronauts to the moon, Carl Sagan through the Cosmos, and Jane Goodall into the jungle. Via electrons and embryos, blood testing and blasting caps, fictional Frankensteins and chatty Nobel laureates, television opened windows onto the world of science. But what promised to be a ...

Science and Religion
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 422

Science and Religion

In this 1991 volume, John Hedley Brooke offers an introduction and critical guide to one of the most fascinating and enduring issues in the development of the modern world: the relationship between scientific thought and religious belief. It is common knowledge that in western societies there have been periods of crisis when new science has threatened established authority. The trial of Galileo in 1633 and the uproar caused by Darwin's Origin of Species (1859) are two of the most famous examples. Taking account of recent scholarship in the history of science, Brooke takes a fresh look at these and similar episodes, showing that science and religion have been mutually relevant in so rich a variety of ways that no simple generalizations are possible. A special feature of the book is that Brooke stands back from general theses affirming 'conflict' or harmony', which have so often served partisan interests. His object is to reveal the subtlety, complexity, and diversity of the interaction as it has taken place in the past and in the twentieth century.

Mathematical Methods in Science
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 234

Mathematical Methods in Science

This book captures some of Pólya's excitement and vision. Its distinctive feature is the stress on the history of certain elementary chapters of science; these can be a source of enjoyment and deeper understanding of mathematics even for beginners who have little, or perhaps no, knowledge of physics.

Science as a Process
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 600

Science as a Process

"Legend is overdue for replacement, and an adequate replacement must attend to the process of science as carefully as Hull has done. I share his vision of a serious account of the social and intellectual dynamics of science that will avoid both the rosy blur of Legend and the facile charms of relativism. . . . Because of [Hull's] deep concern with the ways in which research is actually done, Science as a Process begins an important project in the study of science. It is one of a distinguished series of books, which Hull himself edits."—Philip Kitcher, Nature "In Science as a Process, [David Hull] argues that the tension between cooperation and competition is exactly what makes science so s...

The Science of Conjecture
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 497

The Science of Conjecture

"A magisterial acount of matters as diverse as the Talmud, Justinian's Digest, torture, witch hunts, Tudor treason trials, ancient and medieval astronomy and physics, humanist historiography, scholastic philosophy, speculations in public debt, and 17th century mathematics." -- International Journal of Evidence and Proof

Science on Stage
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 213

Science on Stage

Behind today's headlines stands an unobtrusive army of science advisors—panels of scientific, medical, and engineering experts evaluate the safety of the food we eat, the drugs we take, and the cars we drive. This book studies, theoretically and empirically, the social process through which the credibility of expert advice is produced, challenged, and sustained.