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The Travels of Sir John Mandeville
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 195

The Travels of Sir John Mandeville

Jehan de Mandeville also known as Sir John Mandeville complied a book of travels in circa 1350. Being translated into numerous languages increased its popularity. Even though the book has a fantastical nature it was still used as a reference source by Columbus. The author claims to have been in Paris, Constantinople, aided the Sultan of Egypt in the war against the Bedouin; he had seen Mount Sinai and visited the Holy Land. Mandeville further says that he visited Russia, Krakow, Livonia, and Lithuania. It is believed that the physician Liege was the author of part of The Travels of Sir John Mandeville.

The Travels of Sir John Mandeville
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 206

The Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 1983
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  • Publisher: Penguin

One of the most influential books of the medieval period, John Mandeville's fourteenth-century work was written, ostensibly, to encourage and instruct pilgrims traveling to the Holy Land. A thorough compendium of medieval lore, the travel book proved to be a great success throughout Europe. (Among his alleged readers were Leonardo da Vinci and Christopher Columbus.)

The Book of Marvels and Travels
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 178

The Book of Marvels and Travels

In his Book of Marvels and Travels, Sir John Mandeville describes a journey from Europe to Jerusalem and on into Asia, and the many wonderful and monstrous peoples and practices in the East. A captivating blend of fact and fantasy, Mandeville's Book is newly translated in an edition that brings us closer to Mandeville's worldview.

Writing East
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 335

Writing East

No work revealed more of the mysterious East to statesmen, explorers, readers, and writers of the late Middle Ages than the Book of John Mandeville. One of the most widely circulated documents of its day, it first appeared in French between 1356 and 1371 and was soon translated into nine other European languages. Ostensibly the account of one English knight's journeys through Africa and Asia, it is, rather, a compilation of travel writings first shaped by an unknown redactor. Writing East is a study of how Mandeville's Travels came to appear in its various versions, explaining how it went through a series of transformations as it reached new audiences in order to serve as both a response to previous writings about the East and an important voice in the medieval conversation about the nature and limits of the world. Higgins offers a palimpsestic reading of this "multi-text" that demonstrates not only how the original French author overwrote his precursors but also how subsequent translators molded the material to serve their own ideological agendas.

The Travels of Sir John Mandeville
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 288

The Travels of Sir John Mandeville

This fascinating work, ostensibly written to encourage and instruct pilgrims traveling to biblical lands, recounts the author's alleged experiences in the Holy Land, India, China, and beyond.

Sir John Mandeville
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 60

Sir John Mandeville

Betrifft die Handschrift Cod. 58 der Burgerbibliothek Bern.

The travels of Sir John Mandeville
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 135

The travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 1980
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  • Publisher: Unknown

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Mandeville's Travels
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 284

Mandeville's Travels

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 2007-11
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  • Publisher: Ghose Press

PREFACE. THE Author of this very practical treatise on Scotch Loch - Fishing desires clearly that it may be of use to all who had it. He does not pretend to have written anything new, but to have attempted to put what he has to say in as readable a form as possible. Everything in the way of the history and habits of fish has been studiously avoided, and technicalities have been used as sparingly as possible. The writing of this book has afforded him pleasure in his leisure moments, and that pleasure would be much increased if he knew that the perusal of it would create any bond of sympathy between himself and the angling community in general. This section is interleaved with blank shects for...

The Travels of Sir John Mandeville
  • Language: en

The Travels of Sir John Mandeville

Written to encourage and instruct pilgrims traveling to biblical lands, The Travels recounts Mandeville's experiences in the Holy Land, Egypt, India, China, and "the lands beyond." Five centuries passed before the remarkably exacting accounts of events and geography was found to be probable fabrications. By the standards of the 14th century, the writing style of the man who called himself Sir John Mandeville is so informal as to be nearly chummy: "He who wants to pass over the sea to Jerusalem, may go by many ways, both by sea and by land depending on the countries he comes from; many ways come to a single end. But do not think I shall tell of all the towns and cities and castles that men shall go by, for then I must make too long a tale of it." Historians remain skeptical as to whether the author really did journey to the Holy Land and Egypt, or hire himself out as a soldier to the Great Khan of China. Whatever the case, it is indisputable that he is one of the first modern travel writers, as we have come to know the genre, and that his book was considered authoritative in matters geographical throughout Europe--consulted by Leonardo da Vinci and Christopher Columbus alike.